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Helixyte™ Green Nucleic Acid Gel Stain *10,000X DMSO Solution*

160 ng of 1 Kb Plus DNA Ladder (ThermoFisher 10787018) in 0.9% agarose/TBE electrophoresis gel were stained with Helixyte™ Green and SYBR® Green and imaged with 254-nm UV transilluminator using UVP Bioimaging System.
160 ng of 1 Kb Plus DNA Ladder (ThermoFisher 10787018) in 0.9% agarose/TBE electrophoresis gel were stained with Helixyte™ Green and SYBR® Green and imaged with 254-nm UV transilluminator using UVP Bioimaging System.
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Catalog Number17590
Unit Size
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Additional ordering information
Telephone1-408-733-1055
Fax1-408-733-1304
Emailsales@aatbio.com
InternationalSee distributors
ShippingStandard overnight for United States, inquire for international
Physical properties
SolventDMSO
Spectral properties
Excitation (nm)498
Emission (nm)522
Storage, safety and handling
H-phraseH303, H313, H340
Hazard symbolT
Intended useResearch Use Only (RUO)
R-phraseR20, R21, R68
StorageFreeze (< -15 °C); Minimize light exposure
UNSPSC41116134

OverviewpdfSDSpdfProtocol


Excitation (nm)
498
Emission (nm)
522
Helixyte™ Green is manufactured by AAT Bioquest, and it has the same chemical structure of SYBR® Green (SYBR® is the trademark of ThermoFisher). Helixyte™ Green is an excellent nucleic acid gel stain. It has the same spectral properties to those of SYBR® Green, thus a great replacement to SYBR® Green (SYBR® Green is the trademark of ThermoFisher). It is one of the most sensitive stains available for detecting double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Helixyte™ Green has much greater sensitivity for dsDNA, thus especially useful for assays where the presence of contaminating RNA or ssDNA might obscure results. Helixyte™ Green stain is ideal for use with laser scanners with the same instrument settings of SYBR Green. Helixyte™ Green is much more sensitive than ethidium bromide for DNA in agarose gels. The gels soaked in diluted Helixyte™ Green stain can be visualized without desalting. It is compatible with UV transilluminators, gel documentation systems, and laser scanners.

Example protocol


AT A GLANCE

Spectral Properties of Helixyte™ Green Nucleic Acid Gel Stain
Excitation/Emission: 497/521 nm when bound to DNA
Important      Helixyte™ Green nucleic acid gel stain is significantly less mutagenic than ethidium bromide. However, we must caution that no data are available on the mutagenicity or toxicity of Helixyte™ Green stain in humans. It should be treated as a potential mutagen and used with appropriate care due to the fact that this reagent binds to nucleic acids. Dispose of the stain in compliance with local regulations.
We have found the greatest sensitivity is achieved by post-staining which also eliminates the possibility of dye interference with DNA migration. While the precast protocol is more convenient, some DNA samples may experience migration, it is highly recommend the gel running time does not exceed more than 2 hours. The following protocols are recommended. However some comparisons might be needed to determine which one better meets your needs.

PREPARATION OF WORKING SOLUTION

Helixyte™ Green working solution (1X)
Make 1X Helixyte™ Green working solution by diluting the 10,000X stock reagent into pH 7.5 - 8 buffer (e.g., TAE, TBE or TE, preferably pH 8.0).
Note     Staining solutions prepared in water are less stable than those prepared in buffer and must be used within 24 hours to ensure maximal staining sensitivity.
Note     In addition, staining solutions prepared in buffers with pH below 7.5 or above 8.0 are less stable and show reduced staining efficacy.

SAMPLE EXPERIMENTAL PROTOCOL

Post-Staining Protocol
  1. Run gels based on your standard protocol.
  2. Place the gel in a suitable polypropylene container. Gently add a sufficient amount of the 1X Helixyte™ Green working solution to submerge the gel.
    Note     Do not use a glass container, as it will adsorb much of the dye in the staining solution.
  3. Agitate the gel gently at room temperature for ~30 minutes, protected from the light.
    Note     The staining solution can be stored in the dark (preferably refrigerated) for a week and reused up to 2 - 3 times.
  4. Image the stained gel with a 254 nm transilluminator or a laser-based gel scanner using a long path green filter, such as a SYBR® filter or GelStar® filter. 

Pre-Casting Protocol
  1. Prepare agarose gel solution using your standard protocol.
  2. Add 1X Helixyte™ Green working solution to the gel and mix thoroughly.
  3. Run gels based on your standard protocol.
  4. Image the stained gel with a 254 nm transilluminator or a laser-based gel scanner using a long path green filter, such as a SYBR® filter or GelStar® filter. 

DNA-Staining Before Electrophoresis
  1. Incubate DNA with a 1:3000 to 1:10,000 dilution of the dye (in TE, TBE, or TAE) for at least 15 minutes prior to electrophoresis.
  2. Run gels based on your standard protocol.
  3. Image the stained gel with a 254 nm transilluminator, or a laser-based gel scanner using a long path green filter such as a SYBR® filter or GelStar® filter. 

Spectrum


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spectrum

Spectral properties

Excitation (nm)498
Emission (nm)522

Product family


NameExcitation (nm)Emission (nm)
Helixyte™ Gold Nucleic Acid Gel Stain *10,000X DMSO Solution*496539

Citations


View all 2 citations: Citation Explorer
A promiscuous DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4
Authors: Zhang, Zhihong and Kottadiel, Vishal I and Vafabakhsh, Reza and Dai, Li and Chemla, Yann R and Ha, Taekjip and Rao, Venigalla B
Journal: PLoS biology (2011): e1000592

References


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Journal: Stroke (2012): 524
Intra-organ Biodistribution of Gold Nanoparticles Using Intrinsic Two-photon Induced Photoluminescence
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Journal: Lasers Surg Med (2010): 630
Screening by imaging: scaling up single-DNA-molecule analysis with a novel parabolic VA-TIRF reflector and noise-reduction techniques
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Journal: Phys Chem Chem Phys (2009): 7713
Novel anatomic structures in the brain and spinal cord of rabbit that may belong to the Bonghan system of potential acupuncture meridians
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Journal: J Acupunct Meridian Stud (2008): 29
Triplet fraction buildup effect of the DNA-YOYO complex studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy
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DNA length evaluation using cyanine dye and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy
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Journal: Biomacromolecules (2005): 2703
Implementation of accurate and fast DNA cytometry by confocal microscopy in 3D
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Journal: Cell Oncol (2005): 225
TO-PRO-3 is an optimal fluorescent dye for nuclear counterstaining in dual-colour FISH on paraffin sections
Authors: Bink K, Walch A, Feuchtinger A, Eisenmann H, Hutzler P, Hofler H, Werner M.
Journal: Histochem Cell Biol (2001): 293
Oxazole yellow homodimer YOYO-1-labeled DNA: a fluorescent complex that can be used to assess structural changes in DNA following formation and cellular delivery of cationic lipid DNA complexes
Authors: Wong M, Kong S, Dragowska WH, Bally MB.
Journal: Biochim Biophys Acta (2001): 61
Photophysical properties of fluorescent DNA-dyes bound to single- and double-stranded DNA in aqueous buffered solution
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Journal: Photochem Photobiol (2001): 585