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Do humans have RNA polymerase?

Posted October 21, 2021


Answer

Yes, humans have RNA polymerase. Humans are eukaryotes and have 3 types of RNA polymerases.

RNA polymerase is the enzyme that’s responsible for transcription in all living organisms. Unlike primitive prokaryotic cells that have a single type of RNA polymerase, eukaryotic cells, which are more complex, have 3 types of RNA polymerases, each of which plays a different role in gene expression.

Humans with their complex organization of cells are eukaryotes and have 3 types of RNA polymerases. RNA polymerase I occurs in the nucleolus and is responsible for synthesizing a pre-rRNA 45S, which forms the major RNA sections of the ribosome after it matures. RNA polymerase II occurs in the nucleus and synthesizes precursors of mRNAs and most snRNA and microRNAs. RNA polymerase III also occurs in the nucleus and synthesizes tRNAs, and rRNA 5S.

This increased complexity of transcription in eukaryotic cells facilitates the sophisticated regulation of gene expression in humans.

Additional resources

Eukaryotic RNA Polymerases and General Transcription Factors

DNA and RNA Quantitation

ReadiUse™ Viral RNA Lysis Buffer