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iFluor® 488 maleimide

HeLa cells were stained with rabbit anti-tubulin followed by iFluor® 488 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L), and nuclei were stained with Nuclear Red™ DCS1 (Cat No. 17552).
HeLa cells were stained with rabbit anti-tubulin followed by iFluor® 488 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L), and nuclei were stained with Nuclear Red™ DCS1 (Cat No. 17552).
HeLa cells were stained with rabbit anti-tubulin followed by iFluor® 488 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L), and nuclei were stained with Nuclear Red™ DCS1 (Cat No. 17552).
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization of Fluorescein and iFluor® 488 labelled Telomere probes in metaphase HeLa cells.
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Physical properties
Molecular weight881.76
SolventDMSO
Spectral properties
Correction Factor (260 nm)0.21
Correction Factor (280 nm)0.11
Extinction coefficient (cm -1 M -1)750001
Excitation (nm)491
Emission (nm)516
Quantum yield0.91
Storage, safety and handling
H-phraseH303, H313, H333
Hazard symbolXN
Intended useResearch Use Only (RUO)
R-phraseR20, R21, R22
StorageFreeze (< -15 °C); Minimize light exposure
UNSPSC12171501
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iFluor® 405 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 488 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 514 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 532 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 555 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 594 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 633 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 647 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 680 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 700 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 750 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 790 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 350 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 405 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 488 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 514 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 532 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 555 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 594 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 633 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 647 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 680 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 700 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 750 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 790 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 350 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 405 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 488 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 514 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 532 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 555 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 594 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 633 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 647 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 680 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 700 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 750 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 790 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 350 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 405 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 488 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 514 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 532 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 555 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 594 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 633 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 647 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 680 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 700 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 750 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 790 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 350-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 405-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 488-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 514-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 532-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 555-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 594-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 633-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 647-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 680-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 700-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 750-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 750 RGD Conjugate
iFluor® 405 hydrazide
iFluor® 800 acid
iFluor® 810 acid
iFluor® 820 acid
iFluor® 860 acid
iFluor® 546 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 546 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 568 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 568 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 546 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 546 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 568 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 568 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 555 alkyne
iFluor® 555 azide
iFluor® 546-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 568-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 350 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 350 tyramide*
iFluor® 546 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 546 tyramide*
iFluor® 555 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 555 tyramide and Opal 570*
iFluor® 568 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 568 tyramide*
iFluor® 594 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 594 tyramide*
iFluor® 647 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 647 tyramide*
iFluor® 680 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 680 tyramide and Opal 690*
iFluor® 700 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 700 tyramide*
iFluor® 750 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 750 tyramide*
iFluor® 790 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 790 tyramide*
iFluor® 555 Tyramide
iFluor® 647 Tyramide
iFluor® 350 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Rabbit IgG
iFluor® 488 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Rabbit IgG
iFluor® 555 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Rabbit IgG
iFluor® 594 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Rabbit IgG
iFluor® 647 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Rabbit IgG
iFluor® 350 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Mouse IgG
iFluor® 488 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Mouse IgG
iFluor® 555 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Mouse IgG
iFluor® 594 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Mouse IgG
iFluor® 647 PSA™ Imaging Kit with Goat Anti-Mouse IgG
iFluor® 840 acid
iFluor® 790-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 800-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 820-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 840-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 860-streptavidin conjugate
iFluor® 488-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 555-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 594-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 647-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 488-Concanavalin A Conjugate
iFluor® 555-Concanavalin A Conjugate
iFluor® 594-Concanavalin A Conjugate
iFluor® 647-Concanavalin A Conjugate
iFluor® 350 Tyramide
iFluor® 546 Tyramide
iFluor® 568 Tyramide
iFluor® 594 Tyramide
iFluor® 555 TCO
iFluor® 594 TCO
iFluor® 647 TCO
iFluor® 555 Tetrazine
iFluor® 594 Tetrazine
iFluor® 647 Tetrazine
iFluor® 440-dUTP *1 mM in TE Buffer (pH 7.5)*
iFluor® 450 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Opal Polaris 480*
iFluor® 633 tyramide
iFluor® 514 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Opal 540*
iFluor® 532 Styramide
iFluor® 633 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Opal 650*
iFluor® 440 Styramide
iFluor® 460 Styramide
iFluor® 610 Styramide
iFluor® 660 Styramide
iFluor® 405 Styramide
iFluor®488-PEG12-dUTP *1 mM in TE Buffer (pH 7.5)*
iFluor®555-PEG12-dUTP *1 mM in TE Buffer (pH 7.5)*
iFluor®647-PEG12-dUTP *1 mM in TE Buffer (pH 7.5)*
iFluor® 800 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 800 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 810 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 810 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 820 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 820 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 840 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 840 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 860 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 860 goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 800 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 800 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 810 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 810 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 820 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 820 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 840 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 840 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 860 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L)
iFluor® 860 goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) *Cross Adsorbed*
iFluor® 430 Tyramide *Superior Replacement for Opal 480*
iFluor® 450 Tyramide *Superior Replacement for Opal 480*
iFluor® 350 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 405 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 514 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 532 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 555 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 594 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 633 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 647 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 660 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 680 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 700 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 750 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 610 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 710 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 790 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 800 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 810 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 820 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 860 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 546 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 568 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 430 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 450 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 840 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 560 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 670 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 460 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 440 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 665 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 690 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® Ultra 594 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® Ultra 647 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® Ultra 750 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 720 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 740 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 597 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 770 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 780 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 570 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 830 acid
iFluor® 830 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 405 azide
iFluor® 675 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 620 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 560-dUTP *1 mM in TE Buffer (pH 7.5)*
iFluor® 750-Concanavalin A Conjugate
iFluor® 605 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 625 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 510 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 540 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 350-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 532-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 680-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 700-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 750-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 790-Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) Conjugate
iFluor® 570 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 568 tyramide*
iFluor® 670 Styramide *Replacement for Opal 690*
iFluor® 445 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 500 succinimidyl ester
iFluor® 680 Tyramide *Superior Replacement for Opal 690*
iFluor® 790 Azide
iFluor® 790 Alkyne
iFluor® Ultra 594 maleimide
iFluor® Ultra 647 maleimide
iFluor® Ultra 750 maleimide
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OverviewpdfSDSpdfProtocol


Molecular weight
881.76
Correction Factor (260 nm)
0.21
Correction Factor (280 nm)
0.11
Extinction coefficient (cm -1 M -1)
750001
Excitation (nm)
491
Emission (nm)
516
Quantum yield
0.91
Although FITC is still the most popular fluorescent labeling dye for preparing green fluorescent bioconjugates, there are certain limitations with FITC, such as severe photobleaching for microscope imaging and pH-sensitive fluorescence. Protein conjugates prepared with iFluor® 488 dyes are far superior to conjugates of fluorescein derivatives such as FITC. iFluor® 488 conjugates are significantly brighter than fluorescein conjugates and are much more photostable. Additionally, the fluorescence of iFluor® 488 is not affected by pH (4-10). This pH insensitivity is a major improvement over fluorescein, which emits its maximum fluorescence only at pH above 9. iFluor® 488 maleimide is reasonably stable and shows good reactivity and selectivity with the thiol group. This iFluor® 488 has spectral properties and reactivity similar to Alexa Fluor® 488 maleimide ( Alexa Fluor® is the trademark of Invitrogen).

Example protocol


PREPARATION OF STOCK SOLUTIONS

Unless otherwise noted, all unused stock solutions should be divided into single-use aliquots and stored at -20 °C after preparation. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles

iFluor® 488 maleimide Stock Solution (Solution B)
  1. Add anhydrous DMSO into the vial of iFluor® 488 maleimide to make a 10 mM stock solution. Mix well by pipetting or vortex.

    Note: For optimal results, prepare the dye stock solution (Solution B) before starting the conjugation process. Remember to use it promptly, as extended storage of the dye stock solution may reduce its reactivity. Solution B can be stored in the freezer for up to 4 weeks, protected from light and moisture. Avoid freeze-thaw cycles.

Protein Stock Solution (Solution A)
  1. Mix 100 µL of a reaction buffer (e.g., 100 mM MES buffer with pH ~6.0) with 900 µL of the target protein solution (e.g. antibody, protein concentration >2 mg/mL if possible) to give a 1 mL protein labeling stock solution.

    Note: The pH of the protein labeling stock solution solution (Solution A) should be 6.5 ± 0.5.

    Note: Impure antibodies or antibodies stabilized with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or other proteins will not be labeled well.

    Note: The conjugation efficiency is significantly reduced if the protein concentration is less than 2 mg/mL. For optimal labeling efficiency, it is recommended that the final protein concentration range between 2-10 mg/mL.

  2. Optional. If your protein does not already contain a free cysteine, it is necessary to treat it with either DTT or TCEP to generate a thiol group. This process is used to convert a disulfide bond into two free thiol groups. If DTT is used, it is important to remove any excess free DTT by dialysis or gel filtration prior to conjugating a dye maleimide to the protein. Below is a sample protocol for generating a free thiol group:

    1. Prepare a fresh solution of 1 M DTT (15.4 mg/100 µL) in distilled water.
    2. To make an IgG solution in 20 mM DTT, add 20 µL of DTT stock per ml of IgG solution while mixing. Let the solution stand at room temperature for 30 minutes without additional mixing (to minimize the reoxidation of cysteines to cystines).
    3. Pass the reduced IgG over a filtration column pre-equilibrated with "Exchange Buffer". Collect 0.25 mL fractions off the column.
    4. Determine the protein concentrations and pool the fractions with the majority of the IgG. This can be done either spectrophotometrically or colorimetrically.
    5. Carry out the conjugation as soon as possible after this step (see Sample Experiment Protocol).

      Note: For the best results, IgG solutions should be >4 mg/mL. If the antibody is less than 2 mg/mL, it should be concentrated. Include an extra 10% for losses on the buffer exchange column.

      Note: The reduction can be carried out in almost any buffer from pH 7 to 7.5, e.g., MES, phosphate, or TRIS buffers.

      Note: Steps 3 and 4 can be replaced by dialysis.

SAMPLE EXPERIMENTAL PROTOCOL

This labeling protocol was developed for the labeling Goat anti-mouse IgG with iFluor® 488 maleimide. Further optimization may be required for your specific proteins.

Note: Each protein requires a distinct dye/protein ratio, which also depends on the properties of dyes. Over-labeling of a protein could detrimentally affect its binding affinity while the protein conjugates of low dye/protein ratio give reduced sensitivity.

Run Conjugation Reaction
  1. Use a 10:1 molar ratio of Solution B (dye):Solution A (protein) as the starting point: Add 5 µL of the dye stock solution (Solution B, assuming the dye stock solution is 10 mM) to the vial of the protein solution (95 µL of Solution A) with effective shaking. The protein concentration is ~0.05 mM, assuming the protein concentration is 10 mg/mL and the protein molecular weight is ~200KD.

    Note: We recommend using a 10:1 molar ratio of Solution B (dye) to Solution A (protein). If the ratio is too low or too high, determine the optimal dye/protein ratio at 5:1, 15:1, and 20:1, respectively.

  2. Continue to rotate or shake the reaction mixture at room temperature for 30-60 minutes.

Purify the Conjugation

The following protocol is an example of dye-protein conjugate purification by using a Sephadex G-25 column.

  1. Prepare the Sephadex G-25 column according to the manufacturer's instructions.

  2. Load the reaction mixture (from the "Run Conjugation Reaction" section) to the top of the Sephadex G-25 column.

  3. Add PBS (pH 7.2-7.4) as soon as the sample runs just below the top resin surface.

  4. Add more PBS (pH 7.2-7.4) to the desired sample to complete the column purification. Combine the fractions that contain the desired dye-protein conjugate.

    Note: For immediate use, the dye-protein conjugate should be diluted with staining buffer and aliquoted for multiple uses.

    Note: For longer-term storage, the dye-protein conjugate solution needs to be concentrated or freeze-dried.

Optional: Characterize the Desired Dye-Protein Conjugate

Determining the Degree of Substitution (DOS) is crucial in characterizing dye-labeled proteins. Lower DOS proteins tend to have weaker fluorescence, but higher DOS proteins may also have reduced fluorescence. For most antibodies, the optimal DOS is between 2 and 10, depending on the dye and protein properties. For effective labeling, the degree of substitution should be controlled to have 5-8 moles of iFluor® 488 maleimide to one mole of antibody. The following steps are used to determine the DOS of iFluor® 488 maleimide-labeled proteins:

  1. Measure absorption—To measure the absorption spectrum of a dye-protein conjugate, the sample concentration should be kept between 1 and 10 µM, depending on the dye's extinction coefficient.

  2. Read OD (absorbance) at 280 nm and dye maximum absorption (ƛmax = 516 nm for iFluor® 488 dyes). For most spectrophotometers, the sample (from the column fractions) must be diluted with de-ionized water so that the OD values range from 0.1 to 0.9. The O.D. (absorbance) at 280 nm is the maximum absorption of protein, while 516 nm is the maximum absorption of iFluor® 488 maleimide. To obtain accurate DOS, ensure the conjugate is free of the non-conjugated dye.

  3. Calculate DOS using our DOS calculator:

https://www.aatbio.com/tools/degree-of-labeling-calculator

Calculators


Common stock solution preparation

Table 1. Volume of DMSO needed to reconstitute specific mass of iFluor® 488 maleimide to given concentration. Note that volume is only for preparing stock solution. Refer to sample experimental protocol for appropriate experimental/physiological buffers.

0.1 mg0.5 mg1 mg5 mg10 mg
1 mM113.41 µL567.048 µL1.134 mL5.67 mL11.341 mL
5 mM22.682 µL113.41 µL226.819 µL1.134 mL2.268 mL
10 mM11.341 µL56.705 µL113.41 µL567.048 µL1.134 mL

Molarity calculator

Enter any two values (mass, volume, concentration) to calculate the third.

Mass (Calculate)Molecular weightVolume (Calculate)Concentration (Calculate)Moles
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Spectrum


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spectrum

Spectral properties

Correction Factor (260 nm)0.21
Correction Factor (280 nm)0.11
Extinction coefficient (cm -1 M -1)750001
Excitation (nm)491
Emission (nm)516
Quantum yield0.91

Product Family


NameExcitation (nm)Emission (nm)Extinction coefficient (cm -1 M -1)Quantum yieldCorrection Factor (260 nm)Correction Factor (280 nm)
iFluor® 350 maleimide3454502000010.9510.830.23
iFluor® 555 maleimide55757010000010.6410.230.14
iFluor® 647 maleimide65667025000010.2510.030.03
iFluor® 680 maleimide68470122000010.2310.0970.094
iFluor® 700 maleimide69071322000010.2310.090.04
iFluor® 750 maleimide75777927500010.1210.0440.039
iFluor® 790 maleimide78781225000010.1310.10.09
iFluor® 488 tyramide4915167500010.910.210.11
iFluor® 800 maleimide80182025000010.1110.030.08
iFluor® 810 maleimide81182225000010.0510.090.15
iFluor® 820 maleimide82285025000010.110.16
iFluor® 860 maleimide85387825000010.10.14
iFluor® 532 maleimide5375609000010.6810.260.16
iFluor® 594 maleimide58760320000010.5310.050.04
iFluor® 405 maleimide4034273700010.9110.480.77
iFluor® 430 maleimide4334984000010.7810.680.3
iFluor® 568 maleimide56858710000010.5710.340.15
iFluor® 633 maleimide64065425000010.2910.0620.044
iFluor® 450 maleimide4515024000010.8210.450.27
iFluor® 488 Styramide *Superior Replacement for Alexa Fluor 488 tyramide and Opal 520*4915167500010.910.210.11
iFluor® 460 maleimide468493800001~0.810.980.46
iFluor® 488 TCO4915167500010.910.210.11
iFluor® 488 Tetrazine4915167500010.910.210.11
iFluor® 665 maleimide667692110,00010.2210.120.09
iFluor®488-dUTP *1 mM in TE Buffer (pH 7.5)*4915167500010.910.210.11
iFluor® 546 maleimide54155710000010.6710.250.15
iFluor® 840 maleimide8368792000001-0.20.09
iFluor® 770 maleimide77779725000010.160.090.08
iFluor® 780 maleimide78480825000010.1610.130.12
iFluor® 830 maleimide830867----
iFluor® 514 maleimide5115277500010.8310.2650.116
iFluor® 660 maleimide66367825000010.2610.070.08
iFluor® 670 maleimide67168220000010.5510.030.033
iFluor® 720 maleimide71674024000010.1410.150.13
ATTO 488 maleimide499520900000.800.250.10
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Citations


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Authors: Yang, Chih-Hsiang and Fagnocchi, Luca and Apostle, Stefanos and Wegert, Vanessa and Casan{\'\i}-Gald{\'o}n, Salvador and Landgraf, Kathrin and Panzeri, Ilaria and Dror, Erez and Heyne, Steffen and W{\"o}rpel, Till and others,
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Endogenous glutamine is rate-limiting for anti-Cd3 and anti-Cd28 induced Cd4+ T-cell proliferation and glycolytic activity under hypoxia and normoxia
Authors: Wik, Jonas A and Chowdhury, Azazul and Kolan, Shrikant and Bastani, Nasser E and Li, Gaoyang and Alam, Kazi and Grimolizzi, Franco and Sk{\aa}lhegg, Bj{\o}rn S
Journal: Biochemical Journal (2022): 1221--1235

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